Single Layer Carries in a Stretchy Wrap

Stretchy Wraps

Stretchy wraps, such as the Boba, Moby and Hana Baby wraps are usually used to make a three layer pre-tied carry, sometimes called a Pocket Wrap Cross Carry (PWCC).   The PWCC is tied on the parent or carer so that it fits them closely without baby then the stretch in the fabric accommodates the baby. This is brilliant for newborns because it is super-supportive and you can pop baby in and out of it all day without needing to re-tie.

Stretchy wrap fabric is knitted rather than woven, feeling more like t-shirt material.  Wraps vary in thickness and in how much they stretch.  Some stretchy wraps stretch in two directions, and some in just in direction (sometimes called a hybrid). One of the most common complaints about stretchy wraps is how hot they get.  There are three layers of fabric over baby’s back which should be considered as if they were three layers of clothing. Even if baby is naked under the wrap, three layers can feel like too many on a hot day. 
Single Layer Carries

There are several single layer carries, normally used with woven wraps, which only involve one layer of fabric over the baby’s back.  If your baby is light enough and your wrap supportive enough these can be used safely with a stretchy wrap. As stated above, wraps vary in the amount they stretch and babies vary in weight and muscle tone so there is no rule regarding how heavy your baby is.  The lighter your baby and the less-stretchy your wrap the better.

If, once you have  put your baby in a single layer stretchy wrap carry, you feel they are not being held close to you, have room to slump or are bouncing about too much then this is not a safe option for you and your baby.  You might consider a two layer carry, three layer carry or progressing to a woven wrap (you have already learnt the skills you will need to use one!)  which, because of the lack of stretch is safe to be used with just one layer.

Front Wrap Cross Carry (FWCC)

This carry is normally the first woven wrap carry learned. Because I’m assuming your baby is very young I have shown it here with a twist underneath the baby’s bottom.  This enables the wearer to tie the carry off behind them without applying pressure to tiny ankles. With a bigger baby the positioning would be slightly different and you would not need to worry so much about the ankles. If your baby is bigger and you feel you can tie without applying pressure to the ankles then cross the tails under the baby’s bottom then take them under the feet and tie behind you without twisting. 

Kangaroo Carry

This carry is another good carry for newborns in a woven wrap which translates well into stretchy wrap wearing. Again I have twisted the tails before tying off (please see point above). 

Please let me know how you get on