Triple Layer Stretchy Wrap Carries 

Triple layer stretchy wrap carries are generally the first carries new parents learn.  These carries can be used with babies and young children for as long as you like so long as the fabric is supportive enough to maintain your child’s position and your child does not exceed the manufacturers recommended weight limit (which normally goes up to at least 35lb).  The fabric must hold your child tight to your body so that they are not able to slump (restricting their airway) and to prevent putting an unnecessary strain on your back and shoulders.

This post contains two options for triple layer carries with a stretchy wrap, the Pocket Wrap Cross Carry and the Front Double Hammock  (see below). It is also possible to use your stretchy wrap to tie a Front Wrap Cross Carry (video tutorial coming soon!).

Pocket Wrap Cross Carry (PWCC)

When people first buy, or receive, a stretchy wrap (e.g. a moby or a Boba)they are generally advised to use it for their newborn baby in a Pocket Wrap Cross Carry (PWCC).  This is a three layer carry which you pre-tie then are able to pop baby in and out of as required throughout the day.

The way a PWCC is tied depends on whether your Wrap is a One-Way or a Two-Way stretchy wrap.  If you don’t know which kind of wrap you have them please read this post.  Video tutorials are provided for both types of wrap below:

Pocket Wrap Cross Carry with One-Way Stretchy Wrap

Pocket Wrap Cross Carry with a Two-Way Stretchy Wrap

Once you have learned how to tie the PWCC you can use the same method to tie a Front Double Hammock (FDH).

Front Double Hammock in a Stretchy Wrap

The Front Double Hammock (FDH) carry is tied in the same way as the Pocket Wrap Cross Carry (PWCC) but, once tied, the baby is inserted differently.  While the two diagonal passes go between the babies legs and are stretched from knee to knee on a PWCC they are used as hammocks instead in a FDH.  Both legs go through both diagonal passes and out of the bottom of the cross.

Which is better?

Which ever works for you and your baby.  Some people find they love the PWCC and the security of having the passes between the baby’s legs so much they do not want to do anything else.  Other people find that using a FDH makes them think more about getting a deep seat and helps them to avoid over extending the baby’s hips.  Please let me know which one you prefer and why.

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Double Layer Stretchy Wrap Carries 

I have previously written about Single Layer Carries in a Stretchy Wrap.  These can be made safe if the baby is light enough, or the wrap supportive enough, to hold the baby in position and prevent them from slumping. 
 When your baby becomes too heavy for one layer of stretchy wrap to support them adequately you can move on to double layer carries.  These have the benefit of added support while remaining cooler than the traditional three layer stretchy wrap carries.

Safety

As with the single layer stretchy wrap carries please make sure baby is well supported by the wrap, their airway is visible and clear, they are not slumped and their chin is off their chest at all times.  

 Semi Front Wrap Cross Carry 

This carry involves one wrap pass and one cross pass.  I believe the combination of wrap and cross passes makes the carry more secure than two wrap passes or two cross passes would be. It is tied at the shoulder with a Slipknot. I found my Slipknot was more ‘slippery’ with a stretchy wrap so you may find it needs extra tightening. The Slipknot is useful for being able to easily tighten after the baby is secure. 


Backwards Semi-Wrap Cross Carry

The passes used in this carry are the same as in the Semi Wrap Cross Carry but the way this carry is tied gives you an inbuilt head support for your baby and replaces the shoulder Slipknot with a hip/back located flat reef knot.  It is not as easy to pass excess slack though a reef knot as it is a Slipknot but it is not difficult either. 

Once you feel your baby is no longer adequately supported by two stretchy wrap layers please move on to three layers or a woven wrap! 

Single Layer Carries in a Stretchy Wrap

Stretchy Wraps

Stretchy wraps, such as the Boba, Moby and Hana Baby wraps are usually used to make a three layer pre-tied carry, sometimes called a Pocket Wrap Cross Carry (PWCC).   The PWCC is tied on the parent or carer so that it fits them closely without baby then the stretch in the fabric accommodates the baby. This is brilliant for newborns because it is super-supportive and you can pop baby in and out of it all day without needing to re-tie.

Stretchy wrap fabric is knitted rather than woven, feeling more like t-shirt material.  Wraps vary in thickness and in how much they stretch.  Some stretchy wraps stretch in two directions, and some in just in direction (sometimes called a hybrid). One of the most common complaints about stretchy wraps is how hot they get.  There are three layers of fabric over baby’s back which should be considered as if they were three layers of clothing. Even if baby is naked under the wrap, three layers can feel like too many on a hot day. 
Single Layer Carries

There are several single layer carries, normally used with woven wraps, which only involve one layer of fabric over the baby’s back.  If your baby is light enough and your wrap supportive enough these can be used safely with a stretchy wrap. As stated above, wraps vary in the amount they stretch and babies vary in weight and muscle tone so there is no rule regarding how heavy your baby is.  The lighter your baby and the less-stretchy your wrap the better.

If, once you have  put your baby in a single layer stretchy wrap carry, you feel they are not being held close to you, have room to slump or are bouncing about too much then this is not a safe option for you and your baby.  You might consider a two layer carry, three layer carry or progressing to a woven wrap (you have already learnt the skills you will need to use one!)  which, because of the lack of stretch is safe to be used with just one layer.

Front Wrap Cross Carry (FWCC)

This carry is normally the first woven wrap carry learned. Because I’m assuming your baby is very young I have shown it here with a twist underneath the baby’s bottom.  This enables the wearer to tie the carry off behind them without applying pressure to tiny ankles. With a bigger baby the positioning would be slightly different and you would not need to worry so much about the ankles. If your baby is bigger and you feel you can tie without applying pressure to the ankles then cross the tails under the baby’s bottom then take them under the feet and tie behind you without twisting. 

Kangaroo Carry

This carry is another good carry for newborns in a woven wrap which translates well into stretchy wrap wearing. Again I have twisted the tails before tying off (please see point above). 

Please let me know how you get on

Video Tutorial: Single Hammock Hip and Back Carry with a Toddler


I use this carry frequently with my 32lb 23 month old.  It is great for days when she wants to get up and down a lot and I don’t want to carry lots of fabric around with me.  It is a very easy carry to transition between front, hip and back, which is great for indecisive toddlers.  

Elsie tends to like being on my back when we are walking about and looking at things, on my hip when we are chatting with friends and on my front to sleep (although she will mix it up!).  

This is not a wriggle proof, nor a particularly secure back carry.  So it’s safety depends on your technique but also, somewhat, on whether your child wants to be in it and picking up on their cues when they start to get bored or fed up with it. 

I have previously demonstrated how to set up a single hammock carry so I have not repeated that information in this tutorial.  

This video shows how to transition from hip to back with a toddler.  Please let me know what you think. 

Video Tutorial: Single Hammock Hip Carry with Slipknot

The Single Hammock with a Slipknot finish is a quick and versatile carry.  As it only involves one pass of fabric over you and your baby it is one of the coolest ways to carry your child.  It can be used to carry your child on your hip or on your chest (or somewhere in between the two) and can be used from birth right through to pre-school age with only minor adjustments. It is poppable meaning that you can take your child in and out without re-tying. 

Both videos below show the carry in the way appropriate for a baby who has head control and who is comfortable having their legs spread.  

The first video is long, and includes verbal explanations:

The second video is much shorter but doesn’t include explanations:

Please let me know which you prefer.